Overview As an introduction to contemporary artistic practices, the bulk of your assessments for…

Overview

As an introduction to contemporary artistic practices, the bulk of your assessments for this course will concern your engagement with the creative assignments. Each of the three projects will develop in response to the course readings, media content and instructor commentary. All projects are achievable with no prior artistic experience and the media required is not specialized and will require no additional purchases beyond the basic resources required to complete any university level course. (i.e.: computer access, mobile phone camera or digital camera, basic stationary items such as pencils, notebooks, rulers etc.) Please see below for specific creative project descriptions.

 

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Purpose

These assessments are designed to help you explore course-related topics in-depth through the act of making your own creative projects. To this end, completing the readings and engaging with the media content and instructor commentary will be crucial in order to have an appropriate frame of reference.

Completing the Creative Projects will help you achieve the following learning outcomes: CLO #1: Examine the significance of images and their role in society. CLO #2: Use innovation, skill and imagination to produce meaningful creative projects. CLO #3: Interpret visual culture and contemporary art using relevant theory and practices. CLO #4: Create projects that express an increased sensitivity to “imaging acts” as powerful means of informing identities, beliefs, values and lived experiences. CLO #5: Develop organizational abilities through observation of technical requirements, project specifications and use of relevant digital interfaces.

Creative Project 1: 20%

Due Week 4 (See Outline for specific due dates)

Overview

This exercises uses the grid-drawing technique to accurately produce a line drawing from an original source photo. Drawing is a primary activity for all artists, just as research plays an important part in mining the the visual history evoked by the compilation of art historical digital images gathered below. By looking closely at the selected images and making these transfers, take note of the information you gain. How does your seeing change as you make the drawing? What distinguishes this close looking from taking a passing glance? How does your experience making this drawing connect with our reading on Semiotics?

Steps Login to the Artstor Digital Library using the U of G library login information. You will need to create your own Artstor account in order to access the selected images you can choose from. Navigate to https://library.artstor.org opens in new window and follow the directions to set up your account.

Once you have logged in, you can navigate to images that have been selected for their wide-ranging vis image. Consider your ability to focus on details, using only lines to communicate visual information. Do NOT use any shading or colour for this exercise. The selection of images you can work from are located as links below. Once you have selected your image, use the Artstor download function to save a copy of the image to your computer. We’ll be using this image to create a simple line drawing. Navigate to a grid-drawing transfer tool, such as this one from ArtTutor opens in new window. You can then upload your selected image to this convenient online tool, make any cropping adjustments, brightening the image and finally adding a suitable number of squares to your grid for ease of transfer. Having too many square units in your grid might make it difficult to follow, whereas having only a few squares will likely not help you to accurately copy the lines and shapes in your selected photo. You can also choose the color of your grid and the thickness of the grid lines. To see any changes, press the “Apply Grid” key. If you are happy with the results, press the “Download” key. This site is a helpful resource and includes a video tutorial if you are confused about any of the steps in this process. You can either print your image or work from your computer, whatever you prefer. Count the number of squares in your grid and make a measurement in order to transfer them to your piece of paper. You are encouraged to work with 11 x 14” paper for this assignment, but it is also acceptable to use the more commonly available 8.5 x 11” paper. Make sure the size of your squares are consistent and will fit in the size of the paper you are working with. (For example, if your grid image is 10 squares across and you want to fit them onto your 8.5 x 11” paper, you can make the squares 1” wide and fit ten of them across your horizontally oriented page with ½” to spare on either side!) Using a light application of HB or 2H pencil, make sure to use a ruler to measure and connect the points of your grid onto your paper. You will have to measure each side of your paper and leave a dot at each measurement where you will be connecting the lines of your grid. Once you have applied your grid to the paper, you can begin using an HB or 2B pencil to draw the outline of everything you can see in your original photo. Remember, you do not need to include shading, texture or colour. This exercise gets you to focus your attention on the lines, composition and organization of the subject. Refer back to the Louise Lawler image from Unit 1 for reference. Develop a strategy for how you wish to deal with shadows and areas of complexity. You may draw the outline of the shadow and the shape it takes, but you must not fill it in. Keep the quality of your mark-making consistent. All lines should a fairly uniform thickness, apart from those areas where a light or bold application can help you communicate volume. By breaking the image down into a grid, you should be able to see how the shapes intersect, connect and bisect all the square units. Follow carefully, starting from one side and transferring all the visual information, working over the entire image one square at a time. Carefully Erase the grid to the best of your ability so that only your line-drawing remains. You may want to erase the grid progressively as you fill in each square with your line drawing. You may choose to go over your line-drawing with a fine black marker or pen, but be careful not to use ink that bleeds into your paper. (Using better quality paper, pen and ink or marker will facilitate this process, if you so choose.) Photograph or scan your completed drawing. Follow the image specifications and Guidelines indicated below, which will apply to all submitted creative projects this term. If you have any questions or difficulty understanding these steps, empower yourself by searching the internet for tutorials such as “grid-transfer” or “how to make a grid drawing”. Many artists teach themselves techniques through online resources and you can improve your skills considerable through your own independent use of the tools that are relevant to your creative interests.

Artsor images:

Select 1 image from the 20 options listed here. Copy and paste this link into your browser and login to your Artstor account in order to view it.

Lorraine O’Grady: Fly by Night opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/AFURNACEIG_10310797117)

Roni Horn: To place. Haraldsdóttir. Part two opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/SS33469_33469_42529932)

Coco Fusco: a True Queen Isabella opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/LARRY_QUALLS_10310851261)

Rosemarie Trockel: Made in China opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/AWSS35953_35953_35444573)

Charles Ray: Unpainted Sculpture opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/LARRY_QUALLS_10310642302)

YinkaShonibare: Fake Death Picture opens in new window (The Death of St Francis – BartoloméCarducho) (https://library.artstor.org/asset/AWSS35953_35953_35443105)

Louise Nevelson: Sky Cathedral opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/AWSS35953_35953_40439046)

Mark Dion: Concrete Jungle (Mammals) opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/LARRY_QUALLS_10310644156)

Guy de Cointet: Two Drawings opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/AFURNACEIG_10310797066)

John Chamberlain: Robustfagotto opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/AWSS35953_35953_35444085)

George Segal: John Chamberlain Working opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/ARTSTOR_103_41822000496677)

Andy Warhol: Sofu Teshigahara opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/AWSS35953_35953_37524821)

Thomas Hirschhorn: Universal Gym opens in new window (one of eighteen views) (https://library.artstor.org/asset/LARRY_QUALLS_10313559334)

Robert Morris: Site: performance opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/ARTSTOR_103_41822001596566), Untitled (Pink Felt) opens in new window(https://library.artstor.org/asset/AGUGGENHEIMIG_10313463928),

Lygia Clark: Sensory Masks opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/ABARNITZ_10310367039 opens in new window), Relational Objects in a Therapeutic Context: Structuring of the Self. Performance opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/ABARNITZ_10310365666), The I And You: Clothes-Body-Clothes Series opens in new window (O eu e o tu: Serieroupa-corpo-roupa) (https://library.artstor.org/asset/ABARNITZ_10310365376)

Roman: Market woman opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/AMICO_METRO_103824759)

Franz XaverMesserschmidt: Vexed Man opens in new window (https://library.artstor.org/asset/AGETTYIG_10313915984)

Submission

All image files must be submitted in the following format and size/resolution specifications. JPEG (.jpg, .jpeg) format RGB colour mode no larger than 1.5 MB no smaller than 72dpi Image width should be minimum 1024 pixels.

If you need to resize your images, you don’t need to use complex software such as adobe Photoshop. On a Microsoft operating system you can resize with the Paintprogram. On a Mac, you can launch the Preview program and choose Adjust Size in the Tools menu.

Grading Expectations

The Creative Projects are worth incrementally more throughout the semester. Project 1 is worth 20%. Project 2 is worth 25%. Project 3 is worth 30%. Your instructor will grade your work using the following rubric.

Project 1 Rubric Successful use of selected Artstor image and clear ability to follow instructions – 5 Attention to grid-transfer technique, accurate measurements and application of grid to paper – 5 Evenness of line and clarity of mark-making, accuracy and attention to detail, legibility of final results – 5 Scanned/photographed image of your work follows the size specifications and upload guidelines – 5

4 x 5 = 20

Creative Project 2: 25%

Due Week 7 (See Outline for specific due dates)

Overview

Choose one of the photographers covered in the readings and media content for this unit, such as Wolfgang Tillmans, Nan Goldin, Cindy Sherman or Renée Cox. Being attentive to compositional strategies, subject matter and the visual style of your chosen photographer, you will develop a series of 4 photographs in dialogue with their work. You might think of this project as a form of artistic homage, which clearly demonstrates the following. Consistent use of artistic strategy in dialogue with chosen photographer. (For instance, if you chose Cindy Sherman, then all of your photographs would likely involve an element of costuming, make-up or prosthetics.) Considered use of photography with sensitivity to lighting, compositional framing, sharpness and focus. Will you use flash photography, natural lighting or stage your images indoors with artificial or studio lights? Reflection on the notion of identity as described in our readings clearly communicated in the submitted photographs. Who is your subject and how are you representing them? Be cautious not to reaffirm existing stereotypes and see if your photographs can be produced in such a way that they more subtly reflect a complex identity. (Do not submit vanity photographs, vacation photos or unthinking party images.) You must shoot these photographs intentionally for this assignment and not use pre-existing images. Submit a brief 250-word statement indicating the photographer you selected and why. Also note the identity/identities you wanted to reflect in your series of images and how you approached your subject using strategies from your chosen photographer. Lastly, be sure to follow the image upload guidelines. Submit 4 individual jpeg photos and be careful to follow the resolution and size specifications.

Submission

All image files must be submitted in the following format and size/resolution specifications. JPEG (.jpg, .jpeg) format RGB colour mode no larger than 1.5 MB no smaller than 72dpi Image width should be minimum 1024 pixels.

If you need to resize your images, you don’t need to use complex software such as adobe Photoshop. On a Microsoft operating system you can resize with the Paintprogram. On a Mac, you can launch the Preview program and choose Adjust Size in the Tools menu.

Grading Expectations

The Creative Projects are worth incrementally more throughout the semester. Project 1 is worth 20%. Project 2 is worth 25%. Project 3 is worth 30%. Your instructor will grade your work using the following rubric.

Project 2 Rubric Style of submitted photographs clearly produced in dialogue with the work of selected photographer – 5 Thoughtful representation of identity, informed by readings and artists discussed in Unit 2 – 5 Technical quality of submitted images in considered relationship to style of chosen photographer – 5 Written statement reflects meaningfully on creative decisions – 5 Scanned/photographed images of your four works, following the size specifications and upload guidelines – 5

5 x 5 = 25

Creative Project 3: 30%

Due Week 11 (See Outline for specific due dates)

Overview

Throughout this course, you have encountered some foundational concepts relating to contemporary artistic practice. For your last assignment, you will be drawing on these many concepts in preparing a propositional project; a performance for social media. You do not need to have a social media account or actively post your final project to social media, but this hypothetical project should engage with online platforms as a means of distribution.

As an online class, we are no doubt aware of the way in which web-based technology allows access to various forms of content. As an introductory course in contemporary art, we’ll adopt the sphere of social media as an exhibition site, developing a performance-based work specifically for presentation via the web. Like many of the works you’ve seen throughout our course, you may choose to produce a photographic document of an action (ie: Gina Pane) or alternately you might choose to document the residue of a subtle intervention in public space (ie: Gabriel Orozco).

Choose a theme from the course content, for example, you might choose to work with the notion of everyday life. Or perhaps your performance will continue to explore issues around identity. You have a lot of creative freedom for this final project, but your work should make use of the content we’ve explored in formulating an appropriate strategy.

You will be assessed on the following: Sketchbook, journal or development notes. These should include brainstorming ideas, visual material, references to course content and some indication of the planning stages you’ve taken in developing your project. Meaningfulness of location. If your project is concerned with public space in everyday life, the site in which you make your performance should reflect that decision and you shouldn’t simply make your performance in your bedroom, just because it’s convenient. Means of presentation. If your performance is durational, consider how much or how little to show. If you engage in a repetitive action, is it necessary to show documentation from the beginning, middle and end of the piece? If you make a video, should you share the whole work or edit it down to a shorter sequence? If your work is more enigmatic, would a textual description suffice and if so, how would this be best presented? Conceptual relevance to course content. Your performance should offer insight into the way you have synthesized ideas and artworks we have looked at in the course. Relatedness to online platforms. How would your performance work be best presented? Is it best suited to a corporate platform such as Instagram or would it be better suited to a website or blog format? Clearly articulate this in a brief written statement about your work, 250 words maximum. Note that this writing is separate from your sketchbook and brainstorming content. Meeting technical requirements. For this project you must upload the following to dropbox: Scan or photo of journal notes, sketchbook pages and brainstorming process, developing your performance-based work. 250-word written statement about your project with reference to conceptual development and relationship to online platforms and themes from the course content. Images or Video (minimum 1, maximum 6) depicting your performance or documenting its residue or a combination of visual strategies that adequately communicate your intentions. As always, the submitted content must follow the image specifications and guidelines.

Submission

All image files must be submitted in the following format and size/resolution specifications. JPEG (.jpg, .jpeg) format RGB colour mode no larger than 1.5 MB no smaller than 72dpi Image width should be minimum 1024 pixels.

If you need to resize your images, you don’t need to use complex software such as adobe Photoshop. On a Microsoft operating system you can resize with the Paintprogram. On a Mac, you can launch the Preview program and choose Adjust Size in the Tools menu.

Grading Expectations

The Creative Projects are worth incrementally more throughout the semester. Project 1 is worth 20%. Project 2 is worth 25%. Project 3 is worth 30%. Your instructor will grade your work with a rubric posted to your dropbox upload.

Project 3 Rubric Sketchbook reflects brainstorming process and note-taking around key concepts related to final project – 5 Considered engagement with location of performance – 5 Thoughtful use of media to document/distribute/present performance-based work – 5 Work developed with due consideration of existing practices encountered through course content – 5 Written statement with reflection on the social media or online platform best suited to your work – 5 Scanned/photographed images of your work & process materials, following the size specifications and upload guidelines – 5

6 x 5 = 30