Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence

Domestic violence can come in many shapes and forms. In some cases, physical injury can occur, while in other cases psychological abuse, deprivation, intimidation or other types of harm can occur (ACOG, 2012). The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recognizes that routine visits and prenatal visits are an ideal time to assess for domestic violence (ACOG, 2012). Assessing for domestic violence can be done by using simple screening questions. These questions should not be asked in front of the abuser or other individuals. ACOG (2012) recommends using a framing statement and confidentiality statement before asking any questions. The framing statement lets the patient know that questions are being asked because relationships play a large role in health and the confidentiality statement lets the patient know that what she states today will not be told to anyone else unless reporting is required (ACOG, 2012).

Risk Factors

Two risk factors for domestic violence include: low education levels and drug and/or alcohol abuse (Huecker & Smock, 2018). Studies have shown that there is an inverse relationship between education levels and rates of domestic violence (Huecker & Smock, 2018). Men are more likely to perpetrate violence if they have low education and women are more likely to experience intimate partner violence (IPV) if they have a low education level (WHO, 2017). Alcohol and drug use are also risk factors for IPV. Alcohol and drug abuse is associated with an increase in the incidence of domestic violence, likely due to the inability of an impaired person to control violent impulses (Huecker & Smock, 2018).

Clinical Signs

Obtaining a history, screening for IPV, and performing a physical exam can help point to IPV. Huecker and Smock (2018) state the most common injuries involved in IPV are on the head, neck, and face. Defensive injuries may also be present on the forearms (Huecker & Smock, 2018). A full physical exam should also evaluate the skin in areas covered by clothing (Huecker & Smock, 2018). Sexual abuse may be harder to identify physically, depending on the nature of the abuse (Huecker & Smock, 2018). Psychological complaints may include: anxiety, depression, and fatigue (Huecker & Smock, 2018). The patient may also have vague complaints, such as chronic pain, headaches, or chest pain (Huecker & Smock, 2018).

References

ACOG. (2012). Intimate Partner Violence. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 518(1), 1-6. Retrieved from https://www.acog.org/-/media/Committee-Opinions/Committee-on-Health-Care-for-Underserved-Women/co518.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20190318T0127216097

Huecker, M., & Smock, W. (2018). Domestic violence. Treasure Island, FL: StatPearls Publishing. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK499891/

WHO. (2017). Violence against women. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/violence-against-women