What factors inhibited the early war against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

What factors inhibited the early war against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

Please watch the film, And the Band Played On.

This film may be available on the Internet through free sites such as Youtube and Vimeo (please note: accessing these sites is at your own risk). You may also view the film for purchase online through sites such as Amazon or HBO.

What factors inhibited the early war against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)? Do you believe the AIDS outbreak could have been stopped? Why or why not? What role does advocacy play in the film? How much publicity does HIV/AIDS receive today? What’s the story of HIV/AIDS in the 21st century? Explain.

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Reply 1 Elizabeth

In the film And the Band Played On, some factors that inhibited the early war against AIDS were namely funding and that people didn’t really seem to care about the disease, because they thought they were immune to it if they weren’t a gay male.

I’m not sure the AIDS outbreak could have been stopped but I do think it could have been drastically slowed if proper attention had been paid to it in the beginning. For instance, the incubation period is so long that people could have spread it to many people before they knew they had it. It continues to spread through sexual transmission despite people knowing exactly how it is spread now. COVID-19 has a much shorter incubation period and we’re still spreading that to eachother all the time, albeit through a much different manner.

Advocacy plays a huge role in the film. Without advocacy, research wouldn’t have gotten to where it is today.

When I did a Google New search for “HIV or AIDS,” the first page of 10 stories results in some stories that were posted a few hours ago to stories that were posted 4 weeks ago. I think the disease is still being written about, but certainly not to the extent that it has been in the past. I don’t think that that’s necessarily a bad thing, as evidenced by all of the pandemic fatigue occurring with our current situation.

The story of HIV/AIDS in the 21st century is that the disease still exists, is still being transmitted, makes safe sex absolutely necessary, but that people can live a very long time living with the disease now.

Reply 2 Veronica

According to the CDC, during the initial year after the first reports of AIDS, when the term “gay plague” was commonly used, the disease received relatively little attention from the mainstream media, the public, or politicians. By the end of 1982, however, it was clear that others were at risk for the disease, and what had been complacency turned into serious concern, even panic. Many persons caring for AIDS patients were concerned about their own safety and, in some cases, health-care workers refused to provide needed care. To provide guidance for protection of clinicians and laboratory workers managing patients with AIDS and their biologic specimens, CDC issued guidelines in November 1982 that were based on those previously recommended to protect against hepatitis B virus infection. Early factors that were inhibited here were the denial and nonacceptance of gay people. I believe that AIDS outbreak could have been prevented if the right public health measures were taken such as control over the release of false information and what was responsible for how the disease was transported. Nowadays, it is widely accepted that AIDs is a terrible disease. The public brings awareness and sheds light on preventing it instead of how the media portrayed against it before.

Discussion 2

How do occupation and culture influence psychosocial stressors that affect middle-aged adults? How does your occupation influence psychosocial stressors?

Reply1 Maria

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Workplaces and culture are essential components in people’s lives and play a significant role in the way individuals perceive their general well-being. Evidence has shown a connection between work and satisfaction (Katsantonis, 2020). Work, personal life, and culture are vastly interconnected such that an action in one environment will eventually affect the other environment. For middle-aged adults, work pressures may impact their personal lives, social relationships, or family relationships. On the other hand, a culture will impact their perception and attitudes of their environment. As a nurse, my workplace stress has affected my practice, psychological well-being, and social relationships. Caring for patients may sometimes be challenging, and working extra hours contributes to my burnout, which eventually impacts my personal and professional life.

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Reply 2 Valerie

Middle aged adults or adults between the ages of 35-65 struggle with generativity versus stagnation (Edelman, 2014). The positive of the two, generativity depend greatly on the persons perception and position in their life including occupation and roles according to their culture and environment. Some stressors that can affect persons achieving the goals of generativity in their occupation is how productive they are and how have they applied their own creativity. When one feels like they have been stagnant or lacking in accomplishment it is unhealthy.

Culture and environment play a big role in one’s perception of their generativity. For example in my Haitian American culture if you are not in a good place in your career, married, have children, a nice car and your own home by this stage you are not doing good. Other cultures have their own expectations for their age groups and that can be stressful.

As a public health nurse my occupation does impose lots of stress because the well being of a community is influenced by my daily activities. My workplace as mental health services, group activities and therapy, and many other perks to help us release stress. We have lots of benefits including perks that help alleviate the stress like increased amount of paid time off and sick time compared to other workplaces. This helps me have time to unwind to be healthy and also available for the other roles I have. As a middle adult I am one that struggles with role identity, including being a student, a single parent to my kids, a caregiver to my elderly parents and grandparents, a full time nurse. This is stressful and requires me to be aware of my own emotions so that when I become overwhelmed I can take a step back.